Chemistry

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When you enroll for courses through Coursera you get to choose for a paid plan or for a free plan

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About this course: This course is designed to cover subjects in advanced high school chemistry courses, correlating to the standard topics as established by the American Chemical Society. This course is a precursor to the Advanced Chemistry Coursera course. Areas that are covered include atomic structure, periodic trends, compounds, reactions and stoichiometry, bonding, and thermochemistry.

Created by:  University of Kentucky
  • Taught by:  Dr. Allison Soult, Lecturer

    Chemistry
  • Taught by:  Dr. Kim Woodrum, Sr. Lecturer

    Chemistry
Language English, Subtitles: Spanish How To Pass Pass all graded assignments to complete the course. User Ratings 4.6…

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Didn't find what you were looking for? See also: Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Chemical Physics, Applied Chemistry, and Cartography.

When you enroll for courses through Coursera you get to choose for a paid plan or for a free plan

  • Free plan: No certicification and/or audit only. You will have access to all course materials except graded items.
  • Paid plan: Commit to earning a Certificate—it's a trusted, shareable way to showcase your new skills.

About this course: This course is designed to cover subjects in advanced high school chemistry courses, correlating to the standard topics as established by the American Chemical Society. This course is a precursor to the Advanced Chemistry Coursera course. Areas that are covered include atomic structure, periodic trends, compounds, reactions and stoichiometry, bonding, and thermochemistry.

Created by:  University of Kentucky
  • Taught by:  Dr. Allison Soult, Lecturer

    Chemistry
  • Taught by:  Dr. Kim Woodrum, Sr. Lecturer

    Chemistry
Language English, Subtitles: Spanish How To Pass Pass all graded assignments to complete the course. User Ratings 4.6 stars Average User Rating 4.6See what learners said Coursework

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University of Kentucky The University of Kentucky is the Commonwealth’s flagship, land-grant institution of higher learning. With more than 30,000 students and 16 academic colleges and a graduate school, it is one of only eight universities in America with the full range of professional, medical and liberal arts programs on one contiguous campus.

Syllabus


WEEK 1


Week 1



We will learn about the components inside the atom and look especially at the electrons. The electron structure determines the properties of the elements. So, by the end of this series of lessons, you will know for each elements where the electrons are located in the atom.


17 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Unit 1 Lecture Notes and Practice Problems
  2. Video: 1.01 Subatomic Particles: Protons, Neutrons, Electrons and the Nucleus
  3. Video: 1.02 Understanding Light
  4. Video: 1.03 Quantum Theory, Energy and frequency and the photoelectric effect
  5. Video: 1.03a Energy of Photon
  6. Video: 1.03b Watts to Photons
  7. Video: 1.04 Bohr's model of the hydrogen atom
  8. Video: 1.05 The dual nature of the electron
  9. Video: 1.06 The Heisenberg Uncertainty principle
  10. Video: 1.07 Quantum Numbers
  11. Video: 1.07a Quantum Numbers
  12. Video: 1.08 Explaining Atomic Theory
  13. Video: 1.08a Balmer Series
  14. Video: 1.09 Atomic Orbitals
  15. Video: 1.10 Orbital Diagrams
  16. Video: 1.10a QN and Orbital Diagram
  17. Video: 1.11 Electron Configuration
  18. Video: 1.11a Electron Configuration

Graded: Unit 1: The Atom and its Electronic Structure

WEEK 2


Week 2



Once we understand the electronic structure, we will be able determine how the periodic table can be used to compare the elements according to atomic size and various energies. We will conclude by seeing how these trends can be used to predict chemical properties of the elements.


10 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Unit 2 Lecture Notes and Practice Problems
  2. Video: 2.01 Navigating the Periodic Table
  3. Video: 2.02 Monoatomic ions and electron configuration
  4. Video: 2.02a Electron Configuration of Ions
  5. Video: 2.03 Effective Nuclear Charge and atomic and ionic radii
  6. Video: 2.03a Isoelectronic and Radii
  7. Video: 2.04 Ionization Energy
  8. Video: 2.04a Wavelength of light emitted from first excited state
  9. Video: 2.04b Hydrogen-like atom of flourine
  10. Video: 2.05 Electron Affinity
  11. Video: 2.06 Properties of Representative Elements

Graded: Unit 2: Periodic Trend

WEEK 3


Week 3



Now that we know the structure of an atom, we can explore how atoms combine to form either molecular or ionic compounds. Then we will learn the rules of nomenclature that ensure that a compound is named according to IUPAC rules. We will end this unit by looking at quantitative relationships for compounds including the molar mass of and mass percent of an element in a compound.


30 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Unit 3 Lecture Notes and Practice Problems
  2. Video: 3.01 Elements vs. Compounds
  3. Video: 3.02 Types of Chemical Bonds
  4. Video: 3.03 Chemical Formulas
  5. Video: 3.04 Formula of ionic compounds
  6. Video: 3.04a Formula of the compound formed from aluminum and phosphorus
  7. Video: 3.04b Formula of the compound formed from ammonium and phosphate
  8. Video: 3.05 Nomenclature
  9. Video: 3.06 Nomenclature of Ionic Compounds
  10. Video: 3.06a IUPAC Name for K2SO4
  11. Video: 3.06b IUPAC Name for NiCO3
  12. Video: 3.06c Formula for manganese(II) flouride
  13. Video: 3.06d IUPAC Name for AgNO3
  14. Video: 3.06e Formula for chromium(III) oxide
  15. Video: 3.07 Nomenclature of Molecular Compounds
  16. Video: 3.07a IUPAC Name for PCl3
  17. Video: 3.07b IUPAC Name for N2O
  18. Video: 3.07c Formula for boron triflouride
  19. Video: 3.08 Nomenclature of Acids
  20. Video: 3.09 Molar Mass of Compounds
  21. Video: 3.09a Molecular Mass of Al2(Cr2O7)3
  22. Video: 3.09b Mass of a sample of vitamin C
  23. Video: 3.09c Moles of sucrose within a sugar cube
  24. Video: 3.10 Mass percent composition
  25. Video: 3.10a Mass percent of chromium
  26. Video: 3.10b Mass of CaCl2 containing chlorine
  27. Video: 3.11 Relationships from Chemical Formulas
  28. Video: 3.11a Mass of H in Ca(H2PO4)2
  29. Video: 3.11b Mass of NH3
  30. Video: 3.12 Chemical formulas from experimental data
  31. Video: 3.12a Empirical formula of a compound containing sulfur and oxygen

Graded: Unit 3: Compounds

WEEK 4


Week 4



We will explore how compounds react with one another to form new substances and then write balanced chemical equations to represent what is happening in a reaction. We will explore several different types of reactions including precipitation, acid-base, oxidation-reduction, and combustion reaction.


14 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Unit 4 Lecture Notes and Practice Problems
  2. Video: 4.01 Writing Balanced Chemical Equations
  3. Video: 4.01a Balance the following equation 1
  4. Video: 4.01b Balance the following equation 2
  5. Video: 4.02 Aqueous solutions
  6. Video: 4.03 Solubility of ionic compounds
  7. Video: 4.04 Precipitation Reactions
  8. Video: 4.05 Molecular, Ionic and Net ionic Equations
  9. Video: 4.05a Net ionic equation
  10. Video: 4.06 Acid-base reactions
  11. Video: 4.07 Oxidation-reduction reactions
  12. Video: 4.07a Oxidation Numbers
  13. Video: 4.07b Oxidized and Reduced species identification
  14. Video: 4.08 Combustion Reactions
  15. Video: 4.08a Balance the following equation 3

Graded: Unit 4: Reactions

WEEK 5


Week 5



This unit will delve into the quantitative relationships we can determine from a balanced chemical equation to determine the relative amounts of substances needed to react or the amount of products formed. We will also explore limiting reagents and percent yield to address practical aspects of chemical reactions because there may be leftover reactants and/or incomplete formation of products.


23 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Unit 5 Lecture Notes and Practice Problems
  2. Video: 5.01 Stoichiometry of Chemical Reactions: Mole to Mole
  3. Video: 5.01a How many Moles of water are produced
  4. Video: 5.01b How many Moles of CO2 are produced
  5. Video: 5.02 Stoichiometry of Chemical Reactions: Mass Relationships
  6. Video: 5.02a How many grams of magnesium are required
  7. Video: 5.02b How many grams of magnesium do we need
  8. Video: 5.03 Limiting and Excess Reagents
  9. Video: 5.04 Limiting and Excess Reagents: Calculations
  10. Video: 5.04a How many grams of H2S can be formed
  11. Video: 5.04b What mass of excess reactant will remain
  12. Video: 5.05 Theoretical & Percent Yields
  13. Video: 5.05a Methyl Salicylate is prepared
  14. Video: 5.05b A student needs 625 g of zinc sulfide
  15. Video: 5.06 Solution Concentration
  16. Video: 5.06a Find the mass percentage for a solution prepared
  17. Video: 5.06b Find the volume percentage for a solution prepared
  18. Video: 5.06c Find the mass/volume percentage for a solution prepared
  19. Video: 5.06d What is the molarity of a solution made
  20. Video: 5.06e How many grams of LiCl do we need
  21. Video: 5.07 Dilution of Solutions
  22. Video: 5.07a What is the concentration of the solution
  23. Video: 5.08 Solution Stoichiometry
  24. Video: 5.08a What volume of HBr is required

Graded: Unit 5: Stoichiometry

WEEK 6


Week 6



This unit looks more in depth at molecular compounds to see how they are bonded together by looking at Lewis structures. These structures provide information about the types of bonds (single, double, or triple) as well as the connectivity of atoms. By knowing the Lewis structure, we can also predict the three-dimensional geometry of an individual molecule.


23 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Unit 6 Lecture Notes and Practice Problems
  2. Video: 6.01 Lewis symbols
  3. Video: 6.02 Covalent bonds
  4. Video: 6.03 Electronegativity
  5. Video: 6.04 Lewis Structures Part 1
  6. Video: 6.04 Lewis Structures Part 2
  7. Video: 6.04a Draw the Lewis structure for H2O
  8. Video: 6.04b Draw the Lewis structure for H2CO
  9. Video: 6.04c Draw the Lewis structure for CCL4
  10. Video: 6.04d Draw the Lewis structure for NH3
  11. Video: 6.05 Resonance & Formal Charge
  12. Video: 6.05a Determine the formal charg on atoms in NH4+
  13. Video: 6.05b Determine the formal charge on atoms in H2CO
  14. Video: 6.06 Exceptions to the Octet Rule
  15. Video: 6.06a Draw the Lewis structure for I3-
  16. Video: 6.06b Draw the Lewis structure for ClF4
  17. Video: 6.06c Draw the Lewis structure for XeF4
  18. Video: 6.07 VSEPR Part 1
  19. Video: 6.07 VSEPR Part 2
  20. Video: 6.07a Determine the electron pair and molecular geometries for I3-
  21. Video: 6.07b Determine the electron pair and molecular geometries for NH3
  22. Video: 6.07c Determine the electron pair and molecular geometries for ICl4-
  23. Video: 6.07d Determine the electron pair and molecular geometries for PF5
  24. Video: 6.07e Determine the electron pair and molecular geometries for XeF2

Graded: Unit 6: Covalent Bonding

WEEK 7


Week 7



In this unit, we will learn about thermochemistry, which is the study of the thermal energy transfer (heat) in chemical reactions. We will learn how these measurements of heat are made via calorimetry. Then, learn to calculate heat transfer using various methods.


15 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Unit 7 Lecture Notes and Practice Problems
  2. Video: 7.01 Thermochemistry: Foundational Definitions
  3. Video: 7.02 Introduction to Thermodynamics
  4. Video: 7.02a Work
  5. Video: 7.03 Enthalpy
  6. Video: 7.04 Thermochemical Equations
  7. Video: 7.04a Heat Produced from Na
  8. Video: 7.04b Delta H for aluminum and chlorine
  9. Video: 7.05 Enthalpy Change and the First Law of Thermodynamics
  10. Video: 7.05a Delta E for acetylene
  11. Video: 7.06 Calorimetry
  12. Video: 7.06a Rocket Fuel
  13. Video: 7.06b Delta H for CaO
  14. Video: 7.07 Calculating Enthalpy Change
  15. Video: 7.07a Heat capacity of bomb
  16. Video: 7.07b Strontium carbonate

Graded: Unit 7: Thermochemistry
Graded: Final Assessment
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